Dr. Andre, Why do I have a quick temper?

Why do i get mad so quickly?

A quick temper is often a result of being parented by one or both parents who had a quick temper.

In order to be more level in one’s response there would have to have been models of that behavior in your early environment. If both of your parents were able to handle their anger in a healthy way and you still find your self with a quick temper then there is probably some kind of trauma that caused the temper. If something happened in your life that was a great injustice or extremely frightening and you didn’t have help to handle it, then anything that reminds you of the incident could trigger an anger response. It might seem irrational to you but there is always an underlying cause that can be tracked down.

Does group therapy help anger management? Groups are very helpful. First you get to meet other people who are dealing with the same problem and it helps the feeling of being alone with the problem and you have people who understand what you are going through and who you can talk about your issues with. Hearing a lot of different people talk about their anger helps you to understand more about your own anger and having a lot of people giving how they deal with their anger gives you different things to try in your own life.

-Submitted by Counselor Chris DesJardins, M.Ed., CI

Contact us today in Metairie or Mandeville for help with anger management therapy.

Do I have a Dissociative Disorder?

Dissociative Disorders are those psychological disorders characterized by a person’s tendency to dissociate, or “check out” mentally.  Of course, we all dissociate in small ways, such as when read something and then don’t remember what we just read, or when we drive somewhere without remembering getting there.  While this level of dissociation is normal, the frequency and intensity of dissociation is much higher in that group of disorders.  Conditions such as Multiple Personality Disorder, now called Dissociative Identity Disorder, are real.  The ability of the brain to dissociate is a coping mechanism, a way of blocking out or sectioning off certain information to attend to other information.  When someone has a dissociative disorder, they have a need to block out such an overwhelming amount of information that dissociation is their primary coping skill in life.  People who have undergone severe trauma have a higher likelihood of dissociative disorders.

…characterized by a person’s tendency to “check out” mentally

In everyday life, a common place to see problematic dissociation (although not at the level of being a disorder) is in rage and domestic violence.  Sometimes people become so angry that they are physiologically and/or psychologically overwhelmed, and the mind dissociates.  This creates a situation where the angry person “blacks out” or does not remember what occurred.  In another example, people experiencing high levels of stress or anxiety might say or do something they don’t remember.

…a common place to see problematic dissociation is in rage and domestic violence.

Therapy can be effective when dissociation is problematic, such as in the anger example, and when there is an actual dissociative disorder.  In therapy, we help clients learn to handle the stress or anger (or other trigger) without actually blocking information from consciousness.

We are located in Metairie (504) 717-4043 or Mandeville (985) 624-2942. Call us for information on how to deal with dissociative disorders.

Dr. Andre Sagrera Judice, Ph.D., LPC, LMFT, DCEP

Does group therapy help anger management?

Dr. Andre, Will group therapy help me with my anger issues?

Group therapy can be helpful for many different problematic areas in one’s life including anger management.  Anger is a normal emotional response, but it’s what we do with it that can lead to problems.  What aspects of your life are being affected by your angry responses, relationships, work, etc?  Do you ever feel the need to “hold-in” your anger?  What are the typical physical responses when angry?  It’s important to consider these questions to determine your need for group or individual anger management therapy.

Group anger management has some benefits that individual therapy does not offer.

Group anger management has some benefits that individual therapy does not offer.  Being involved in a group allows you to see others coping with the same challenges.  It can be helpful to hear other personal stories of failures and successes.  Either way, effective therapy will help you to learn ways of approaching anger and expressing it in a healthy fashion.

If you would like to join our monthly anger management group therapy session, please call our office for an appointment. We’re located in Metairie (504) 717-4043 or Mandeville (985) 624-2942

Dr. Andre Sagrera Judice, Ph.D., LPC, LMFT, DCEP